Friday, September 5, 2008

Friday From The Collectors

"THE BEST OF"



If you've missed an Edition of The Collectors Series, now is the time to catch up on your reading. These are some truly unique, educational and entertaining articles.

EDITION 1

Becky Wiseman

Becky Wiseman
kinexxions

A MOMENT IN TIME

With the release of the shutter, or the press of a button, the photographer captures a moment in time. The moment is gone, although it may be preserved on a piece of celluloid, or as in this digital age in which we now live, mysteriously stored as bits and bytes, a series of 1s and 0s.

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EDITION 2




My Approach to the Monumental Task of Photographing
and Inventorying a Country Cemetery:
Some Grave Considerations

Becky Wiseman, writing in this space last Friday, established that photographs are windows to a moment in time --- and in the absence of a photograph, what better glimpse of the past is there than a grave marker? Next to census records and written family documents, the data recorded on tombstones are considered primary source materials by most researchers.

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Please see the update to Terry's Article
In The Comments

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Edition 3


L. H. Crawley

TWO DEAR FRIENDS

When I was eighteen and looking for a new middle name - a family surname - I nearly chose Taylor, after the other Laura in the family. I eventually chose Hicks, to honor my grandmother, because I did not know enough about Laura Taylor to make the gesture meaningful. All I knew was that she was a cousin who had moved to Louisiana, and that she used to come up to New York on the bus to visit the Hickses, in the 1920s.

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Edition 4

By Craig Manson
geneablogie



OSCAR WILDE, SONNY BONO AND
THE NAKED ORPHANS


Have you seen her copyright notice?

This week, I'm reading papers written by my public policy students. They could choose just about any topic and propose a change in public policy concerning that topic. Curiously, three of twenty-four of them wrote about issues concerning copyright in this so-called digital age. So I have been pondering their musings with respect to the Copyright Act of 1790 as well as the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

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Edition 5


WHY DIGITAL PHOTO RESTORATION IS IMPORTANT


I've been into the visual arts since 1969 when I was the first one at my university to lug around the then new Ampex reel-to-reel video portapak. Oh, I wish I had those tapes; each one was an avant-garde masterpiece, or so I vaguely recall. I wish I kept copies of all the tapes I subsequently produced in a career of television, industrial, education and freelance video work. But I wasn't thinking about archiving and preservation in those good old analog days.

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Edition 6


THE FUTURE OF MEMORIES

By Denise Olson
Family Matters


This week a group of people from around the country came together to share loving memories of mothers past and present. No, it wasn't a family reunion but a blog carnival and most of the participants have never met face-to-face. Each individual either posted their photos and stories on their web/blog site or wrote them as an email and forwarded the message or link to our gracious hostess. The result was delightful.

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Edition 7


DOCUMENTING TODAY FOR
TOMORROW'S HISTORY

By Nikki-ann
Notes of Life

We have to be careful when documenting today for today's documents might not be accessible tomorrow. Technology advances so quickly these days, compared to times gone by. If digital documents aren't printed who's to say we'll be able to view them in the future?

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Edition 8



COMMUNITY HISTORY ON THE RUN


By Chery Kinnick
Nordic Blue


I dreamt about being a published author nearly all of my life. If a fortuneteller had read my palm a few years ago and told me that within a four-month period I would go from the conception of an idea to having a completed book at a publishing house, I would have laughed out loud. Well, it is true, my friends, and I’m here to tell you about that journey.

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Edition 9

THE GIFT OF THE PHOTOGRAPH:
UNITING FAMILIES WITH THEIR HISTORY

By Lisa
100 Years in America
Small-leaved Shamrock
A light that shines again

When I began writing about my family history via weblog just a little over a year ago, my initial goal was to share with my extended family what I had learned over the years digging into family records, photographs and other historical resources. Ever since my interest in genealogy began with the filling out of my personal "pedigree chart" at age eleven, I have been collecting names, photographs and stories. The history of my family has become an important part of me.

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Edition 10


DIGITAL SCRAPBOOKING FOR GENEALOGISTS


Scrapbooks have been around for ages. They are a way of preserving elements of personal and family history in a traditional book format. Unlike a diary, text tends to be at a minimum in scrapbooks. Items such as photos, pressed flowers, keys, medals, and ephemera are the focus of a scrapbook page. Generally speaking, text is used to explain the significance of the items on a given page and/or identify the date and location of an event.

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Edition 11

ELICITING STORIES FROM YOUR
PHOTO ALBUMS

SUSAN A. KITCHENS

Family Oral History - Using Digital Tools


Think about a snapshot you took. Maybe it's someplace you visited. Maybe it's you in your house, or with you and your family, you and your friends (or both). Have you looked at it and the day comes back to you? You think, "Oh yeah, we had this wild, adventurous drive to reach that destination on the edge of a cliff, overlooking a spectacular view. The wind was blowing. And that person there-- what was his name? -- he'd say the most outlandish things. He said-- oh yes, now I remember! he teased me and whatever I said, he'd argue the opposite side.

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Edition 12

Volunteer Genealogical Photography



Dear Ms. Genea-etiquette:

I recently made a request of a volunteer photographer to take a picture of my great-grandmother's grave (located in another state) for the memorial page I created of her on my favorite cemetery website. The photo was posted by the volunteer to the website, but unfortunately, it is somewhat blurry and off-center enough that part of the tombstone is cropped off.

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Edition 13

READING WOMEN'S HISTORY

A Family History Project in the High
School English Classroom



Denise May Levenick
The Family Curator

This is an Independence Day article (of sorts). It is a story about a woman of independent spirit, but no independent means born over 100 years ago – Arline Kinsel Brown – and a group of independent young women of the 21st century.

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Edition 14



FOR THE LOVE OF PHOTOS
~ because every life has a story ~


Every day I look at dozens, if not hundreds, of photos trying to find the next “jewel” to showcase in my store. What catches my eye might be the slight turn of a head, or a look in the eyes, or even a hint of comedy that sets these photos apart from the rest.

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Edition 15

LORINE McGINNIS SCHULZE


Displaying some of my Albums, Ambrotypes &
Daguerreotypes



Types of Early Photographs


Photography arrived in the United States circa 1839 thanks to the newly invented daguerreotype process. A daguerreotype has no negative so if you find a daguerreotype you know you have a one-of-a-kind image.

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Edition 16


I'm going to start with one of the charts we have been showing at conferences this year, my current favorite.

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Edition 17

ACCIDENTAL COLLECTIONS:
IS IT BEST TO KEEP EVERYTHING?


QUEEN FOR A DAY

Generally speaking, I'm not the diva type. Except when it’s my birthday. I have invoked the “Queen for a Day Rule” on my birthday since my age could be measured in single digits. So when The Maven invited me to write a guest column for August 1st – my very own birthday - I knew what I had to do.

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Edition 18

DON'T PURGE – GET CREATIVE!


THOMAS MACENTEE
Destination: Austin Family

As you may have read in my biography or in many of my posts over at Destination: Austin Family, I am a techno-geek, tried and true. I’ve been in the Information Technology field for over 25 years and while I find what I do very satisfying, it doesn’t fulfill a base need that probably exists within most of us: the need to “make” something.

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Edition 19

I Do Collect Photos!


The Photo Detective Website
Family Tree - Photo Detective Blog

After six years of researching and writing about members of the Revolutionary War generation who lived long enough to be photographed, i.e. after 1840, I’m focusing my spare time on one of my collecting interests—weddings photos. See Projects.

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Edition 20

A THOUSAND WORDS LOST


I’ve always heard a picture is worth a thousand words. In the faces of our ancestors complex stories are told. And they are stories a thousand words simply cannot begin to describe. Stories of hope and happiness and tales of sadness and despair are projected from faces on yellowed and fragile images captured generations ago.

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Edition 21

WOMEN WEARING GLASSES

Eyeglasses have a strong claim to be the invention that has brought
the most aid and comfort to human beings. Yet it is curious
that the name of their inventor is not certainly known,
nor the exact date of the invention.
~ A Spectacle of Spectacles ~

LINDA PALMER

Collecting old photographs of women wearing glasses is my passion. I never met one I didn't want. Over the last twenty years I have accumulated a wide variety of these lovely photographs. Some are priceless, others called my name from the dusty confines of various antique shops. All of my treasures give me personal satisfaction. Now I'd like to share that passion with everyone. This will not be a discussion of eye ware or its history. It is a celebration of those brave women wearing glasses.

5 Comments:

Blogger Terry Thornton said...

Thanks MAVEN for providing another look at this special series --- and THANKS for inviting and hosting my report about the New Hope Cemetery project.

I'd like to take this space to give you and your readers an update --- the inventory and transcription were completed; an alphabetized list of the 1800 burials at New Hope Cemetery was posted online and a hard copy given to the cemetery's perpetual care committee. A local printer donated the printing and binding of 100 copies of the index list and, at last count, all but three had sold for $10 each raising $ 970 for the future upkeep of that cemetery. The copyright to the index has been assigned to the cemetery to use as they see fit.

I'm fairly sure that had it not been for the commitment made in this article posted at SHADES that the project would be complete. That this regular column played such an important role in the project will always be appreciated.

Thank you for your encouragement and the opportunity to write about some of my work.

Regards,
Terry Thornton
Fulton, Mississippi
HILL COUNTRY OF MONROE COUNTY MISSISSIPPI
NEW HOPE CEMETERY
LANN CEMETERY BLOG

September 5, 2008 at 7:02 AM  
Blogger Chery said...

fM,

Thank you for such an inspiring collection of articles. I was honored to be asked to contribute to SHADES. I look forward to another long string of unique articles. You have a great gift for creativity and organization!

Chery

September 5, 2008 at 10:36 AM  
Blogger Denise L said...

Thank you fM, for this great encore of Guest Columns. I am so honored to be included. The encouragement and ideas from other genea-bloggers have helped my project to grow in many many directions. As always, I look forward to next Friday.

Best wishes with your new computer, Denise Levenick

September 5, 2008 at 3:24 PM  
Anonymous Lisa said...

A wonderful recap of a great series! You have gathered such an interesting assortment of articles with such different focuses, yet all within the realm of photograph collecting.

Thank-you again, footnoteMaven, for inviting me to share my personal photo collecting story with your readers.

I look forward to many more editions of Friday From the Collectors.

Lisa
Small-leaved Shamrock
A light that shines again
100 Years in America

September 5, 2008 at 3:42 PM  
Blogger Nikki-ann said...

Wow, I didn't realise there had been so many editions so far! This post brings back memories of reading them. Visiting Shades always provides an interesting and thought-provoking read.

Thank you! :)

September 6, 2008 at 6:29 AM  

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