Wednesday, March 17, 2010

I Have A Bug



And as it's Women's History Month, it's a Lady Bug.

I'm going to take some time to try and shake this. Carnival up as soon as I am.

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St. Patrick's Day Meets Women's History Month

~ Young Girl ~
Abernethy
29 High St.
Belfast
Carte-de-Visite

Photographer's Imprint

William Abernethy started his first photographic studio in Belfast in 1885. William claimed to have photographed four generations of the Royal Family. His son, Harold, photographed the Prince of Wales, later to become the Duke of Windsor.

At one point in his career, William had seven studios throughout the province; he and his assistants were known to average three hundred client photographs per day.

In 1900, William Abernathy was honored with a Royal Warrant in Belfast, as photographer to Her Majesty, Queen Victoria. He photographed her during the Royal visit to Dublin in April 1900.

Queen Victoria either presumed preparing for, or recovering from, her grand Dublin review in 1900

Queen Victoria was never particularly enthusiastic about her kingdoms of the “Celtic fringe.” During her sixty-four year reign, she spent seven years in Scotland, seven weeks in Ireland, and seven nights in Wales.

It must have been exceedingly difficult to obtain a Royal Warrant in Ireland or Wales. Mr. Abernethy was very fortunate.

Sources:

Ulster Ancestree

Reconciling the Celt: British National Identity, Empire, and the 1911 Investiture of the Prince of Wales
John S. Ellis, The Journal of British Studies, Vol. 37, No. 4 (Oct., 1998), p. 391; online JSTOR http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0021-9371(199810)37%3A4%3C391%3ARTCBNI%3E2.0.CO%3B2-U : accessed 15 March 2008.

Young Woman. Abernethy. Belfast. Cabinet Card. Unknown.
Privately held by the footnoteMaven, Preston, Washington. 2007.

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Tuesday, March 16, 2010

Twice Told Tuesday - Do Your Best



Twice Told Tuesday features a photography related article reprinted from old photography books, magazines, and newspapers.


In the March issue of Shades, Behind The Camera featured a woman behind the camera, Mrs. E.N. Lockwood. She was a photographer and author of photographic related articles. Twice Told Tuesday reprints one article for the magazine Photographic Mosaics. MRS Lockwood cautions us to always "Do Our Best!" I wonder if this article was the inspiration for "The Devil Wears Prada."


(Written for Photographic Mosaics.)

DO YOUR BEST

BY MRS. E. N. LOCKWOOD


D0 Your Best! Nothing was ever gained by slighting anything you attempted; for whatever is worth doing at all is worth doing well.

You may be hurried or wearied with your work, or something may have gone wrong in the day's labors to make you feel almost discouraged—when, in comes a customer for a sitting. You feel almost angry that they should dare enter your precincts, and the impulse is, not to care whether you do your best or not, if you only get their money, and get rid of them quickly. But, if you fail of doing your work as well as usual, or treat your customers as inward ill-nature is apt to do, under such circumstances, you injure yourself mentally as well as financially; and lose one whom you might have made a lasting friend and patron.

I find this phase of life in every department of business pursuits; and those who succeed are the ones who have learned to do their best, at all times and under all circumstances, letting nothing turn them from their fixed purpose of doing right, and being conscientious in their work, from the smallest to the largest and most important part.

You may be only an apprentice, just beginning in your art-work, having all the drudgery—as it seems to you—to do, and you "hate it, and, in consequence, slight it. Your paper is so carelessly silvered, much has to be thrown away; your glass, also, so poorly prepared, the negatives lose brilliancy and strength. Your workroom is all ''upside down," and littered-up, lacking order in every corner; and you feel just like your room, every time you enter it, not knowing why.

Look within yourself, and see if the fault is not there; and then, at once, make up your mind and determine to do your best by yourself. Search the inner garden of your life— your thoughts; pull out every weed, and give only that which will bring some good to you, or those you labor for, a chance to thrive; and you will soon be surprised at your progress, and the confidence and respect you will acquire from everyone with whom you come in contact.

Try it, young men; try it, young ladies (and even the older ones are not past reformation); and you will never regret the result.


An example of an Egyptian Photograph and

a specialty of Mrs. E. N. Lockwood

discussed in the March Issue of Shades.



Shades also Gives Her Face A Place. This nameless woman photographed by Wagness, Cor. of 11th & Pacific Ave., Tacoma, Wash.

Sources:

Lockwood, Mrs. E.N., "Do Your Best."Photographic Mosaics, June 1883, 104.

Unknown Woman, Wagness. Cabinet Card. Privately held by the footnoteMaven, Preston, Washington. 2007.

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Monday, March 15, 2010

Shades Celebrates Two Years Of Tons Of Fun

Two years ago today with this post, No Place For A Lady, Shades started down the road to blogging history. The history part is that I'm still enjoying it two years later.

It's been a wonderful year for Shades.

First, Shades Of The Departed was voted one of Family Tree Magazine’s 40 Best Genealogy Blogs. Thank you, to all those who voted and to Family Tree Magazine. Shades is honored to be in such esteemed company. And thank you to those who write for Shades, the regular columnists and those who contribute feature articles. They are Shades. Shades is all about the fascination with old photographs and our connection to them. We love what we do.

Today, Shades will have been presenting, Twice Told Tuesday, Web Wandering Wednesday and Many Things Thursday for two years. And this year Shades' dream of becoming a Digital Magazine came true with the November 2009 Inaugural Issue. Thank you to all who read and comment. Those of us who work to create Shades thank you for your support.

Let me introduce you to the heart of Shades. I want to take this opportunity to publicly thank the finest writers and best friends Shades and I could ask for in working toward building an online community dedicated to old photographs and the part they play in our family history.

The excellent writers of Shades write for their own blogs as well. If you enjoy their work, please take a moment to say so and support what they do.



APPEALING SUBJECTS
BY CRAIG MANSON
GeneaBlogie






THE HUMOR OF IT
What's Past is Prologue







THE HEALING BRUSH
BY GEORGE GEDER
George Geder






SAVING FACE
BY REBECCA FENNING
Sense of Face






CAPTURED MOMENTS
BY VICKIE EVERHART
BeNotForgot






THE YEAR WAS
BY SHERI FENLEY
Educated Genealogist






THE Future Of Memories
BY DENISE OLSON
Family Matters






MISS PENELOPE DREADFUL
BY DENISE LEVENICK
The FamilyCurator







IN2GENEALOGY
BY CAROLINE POINTER
Family Stories




I'd also like to thank the Shades readers who have have twittered, emailed, and commented Shades happenings. We do it for you, but we can't do it without you. Thank you!

Here's to the next year!

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Sunday, March 14, 2010

Shades The Magazine - March Issue




(Select Cover or Title Above)


CONTENTS

Saving Face
Finding Relative Nobodies

The Future of Memories
A Plain Brown Wrapper

The Healing Brush
My Ancestral Daughters Of The Dust

In2Genealogy
Where The Belong

Penelope Dreadful
Dreadful Darjeeling

Captured Moments
Who Will Speak Their Names

The Year Was . . .
The Year Was 1925

Appealing Subjects
On Hiatus - Returns April Issue

The Humor Of It
On Hiatus - Returns April Issue

Features

All Photographs Are History
Janine Smith On The Path To Restoration Part I

a woman Behind The Camera

Mrs, E. N. Lockwood, Ripon Wisconsin

In Every Issue


From My Keyboard

Letter from the Editor


The Exchange
Your comments

Smile For The Camera

Tina Lyons - WWII Valentine

The Last Picture Show Back Cover

The graphic image on the back of a carte-de-visite
or cabinet card



INSTRUCTIONS FOR VIEWING

Selecting the page rather than the arrows to turn the pages enables the zoom function. Full screen using the arrows is optimum viewing


MAGAZINE BUTTON BAR


BACK & FORWARD BUTTON


INDEX BUTTON
(SELECT FOR MAGAZINE OVERVIEW)



FULL-SCREEN MODE
(RECOMMENDED FOR VIEWING)


VIEWING MODES
MAGAZINE VIEW - FLIP BOOK
PRESENTATION VIEW - SINGLE PAGE

PAPER VIEW - SCROLL TOP TO BOTTOM


EMAIL


SEARCH THE MAGAZINE


PRINT THE PAGE



PAGE X OF Y


PAGE NAVIGATION



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Friday, March 12, 2010

Give Their Face A Place - March 12



March is Women's History Month. Shades is honoring women within our families and communities by Giving Their Face A Place. March 3 is a photograph of another nameless woman.

Research has not been started on this photograph; what little information is known is included.

This photograph came from an album thought to once belong to the William Turcotte family. It is believed that Turcotte was born in Canada and moved to Michigan. Is there any significance to the empty chair? I wonder.



Unknown Women
Marquette, Werner Michigan.


Photographer's Imprint

G.A. Werner,
Photographer
Gallery, Cor. Main and Third Sts.
Marquette, Mich.

Life Size Portraits in Ink, Water Color,
Pastel and Oil

Views Made of Residences

The 1889 Marquette City Directory lists G.A. Werner at the address displayed on the imprint. As of 1896, the Polk City and County Directory for Marquette Michigan lists Gustavus Werner at 115 S. 3d. May be the exact same studio, the city issuing building numbers between 1889 and 1896.

Also listed in the 1896 Directory is Fanny Holmes an artist working for G. A. Werner. Fanny also boards with her employer.

Photograph:

Woman and Empty Chair. Gustavus A. Werner. Unknown. Privately held by Anella Rogers, Woodinville, Washington. 2010.

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Thursday, March 11, 2010

Coming Attractions!




SHADES THE MAGAZINE

On Issuu Stands This Weekend




Smile For The Camera Extension

Midnight March 11

Published March 17




Shades Of The Departed Blogiversary

March 15

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Wednesday, March 10, 2010

First Do No Harm

Life's little changes. Are you keeping track of what's good for you one day and not the next? Did you notice that one week coffee was bad for you, and then you read the next week it could lower your risk of Parkinson's disease and diabetes, as well as colon cancer?

Are you sitting down?

Just when I had been trained to handle my photographs while wearing white gloves, white gloves are no longer the preferred method. And naturally, that was just after I blogged there was no debate here.
Caution, wear those white gloves, baby, when you handle photographs. Here there is no debate.
Then I received an email from Maureen Taylor saying that she had some new information. While writing her latest book Preserving Family Memories (excellent by the way) she had met with two conservators who said that the use of white gloves is now debatable. "Either wash and dry your hands thoroughly and handle photos by the edges OR wear disposable non-latex examination gloves." The gloves are the preferred method as they give a better grip than white gloves that are the cause of many slips.

I just received my copy of Preserving Your Family Photographs and it's there in black and white on page 28:

"The best precaution is to handle photographs by the edges while wearing disposable exam gloves. They are available at most pharmacies."

I have my new gloves and must admit, they are a much better fit and I have a 1,000 times less trouble handling things. It would be MY opinion, however, that if all you have are white gloves I would use them rather than bare hands. That is MY opinion.

So the creed of all family historians and photograph collectors should be -

Primum non nocere
"First, do no harm"

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Giving Their Face A Place - March 10

During Women's History Month Shades is honoring women within our families and collections by Giving Their Face A Place. March 10 is a photograph of two nameless woman.

Research has not been started on this photograph; what little information is known is included.

This photograph was purchased with a small lot of photographs, all women. They are young, attractive, plainly dressed. Sweet, simple.


Unknown Women
F. C. Mader
Little Palace
14 E. Main St.
Chillicothe, O.

Little Palace Gallery
is now
CONSOLIDATED
WITH THE
Palace Grande Art Studio

All work guaranteed strictly high
grade.
Prices that defy successful competition.
Pastels, crayons and life-sized photo-
graphs made with grand success.
All negatives preserved and dupli-
cates can be had at any time.

F. C. MADER, Photographer,
Ross County Block,
W. Second St., opp. P.O., Chillicothe, O.

Photograph:

Two Young Women. F. C. Mader. Unknown. Privately held by the footnoteMaven, Preston, Washington. 2010.

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Tuesday, March 9, 2010

Giving Their Face A Place - March 9

During Women's History Month Shades is honoring women within our families and communities by Giving Their Face A Place. March 9 is a photograph of another nameless woman.

Research has not been started on this photograph; what little information is known is included.

This photograph came from an album thought to once belong to the William Turcotte family. It is believed that Turcotte was born in Canada and moved to Michigan.


Unknown Woman
W. A. Riechel, Red Lake Falls, Minn.

Written On Reverse
Mrs. Martha Turcotte

The Directory of Photographers at the Minnesota Historical Society has the following listing for W. A. Riechel.

Riechel, W. A.

Locations:

Address: Red Lake Falls, Minnesota

Dates of operation: 1894-1906, 1910-1914, 1926

Decades Worked in Minnesota: 1890s; 1900s; 1910s; 1920s


Photograph:

Standing Woman. W. A. Riechel. Unknown. Privately held by Anella Rogers, Woodinville, Washington. 2010.

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Monday, March 8, 2010

Week Two - Giving Their Face A Place

This is week two of Women's History Month. Shades is honoring women within our families and communities by Giving Their Face A Place.

Research has not been started on this photograph; what little information is known is included.

Shades starts the second week of Women's History Month with the same six women who kicked off the month. This time they have covered their heads with some lovely hats of the period. The woman in the center is holding an album. Was it a photographer's prop or a family remembrance album? So much to discover! It is believed that Turcotte was born in Canada and moved to Michigan. This album will be featured for the first week of March.



Unknown Women
Marquette, Werner Michigan.


Photographer's Imprint

G.A. Werner,
Photographer
Gallery, Cor. Main and Third Sts.
Marquette, Mich.

Life Size Portraits in Ink, Water Color,
Pastel and Oil

Views Made of Residences

The 1889 Marquette City Directory lists G.A. Werner at the address displayed on the imprint. As of 1896, the Polk City and County Directory for Marquette Michigan lists Gustavus Werner at 115 S. 3d. May be the exact same studio, the city issuing building numbers between 1889 and 1896.

Also listed in the 1896 Directory is Fanny Holmes an artist working for G. A. Werner. Fanny also boards with her employer.

Photograph:

Six Women With Hats. Gustavus A. Werner. Unknown. Privately held by Anella Rogers, Woodinville, Washington. 2010.

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Friday, March 5, 2010

My Favorite - Give Their Face A Place - March 5



March is Women's History Month. Shades is honoring women within our families and communities by Giving Their Face A Place. March 3 is a photograph of another nameless woman.

Research has not been started on this photograph; what little information is known is included.

This is my favorite photograph in the album thought to once belong to the William Turcotte family. This woman's hands are so elegant. The framed photograph of the dog is fascinating. Was the photograph a prop or a remembrance of a cherished family pet? So much to discover! It is believed that Turcotte was born in Canada and moved to Michigan. This album will be featured for the first week of March.



Unknown Women
Marquette, Werner Michigan.


Photographer's Imprint

G.A. Werner,
Photographer
Gallery, Cor. Main and Third Sts.
Marquette, Mich.

Life Size Portraits in Ink, Water Color,
Pastel and Oil

Views Made of Residences

The 1889 Marquette City Directory lists G.A. Werner at the address displayed on the imprint. As of 1896, the Polk City and County Directory for Marquette Michigan lists Gustavus Werner at 115 S. 3d. May be the exact same studio, the city issuing building numbers between 1889 and 1896.

Also listed in the 1896 Directory is Fanny Holmes an artist working for G. A. Werner. Fanny also boards with her employer.

Photograph:

Elegant Woman. Gustavus A. Werner. Unknown. Privately held by Anella Rogers, Woodinville, Washington. 2010.

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Thursday, March 4, 2010

Give Their Face A Place - March 4

March is Women's History Month. Shades is honoring women within our families and communities by Giving Their Face A Place. March 3 is a photograph of another nameless woman.

Research has not been started on this photograph; what little information is known is included.

This photograph came from an album thought to once belong to the William Turcotte family. It is believed that Turcotte was born in Canada and moved to Michigan. This album will be featured for the first week of March.



Unknown Women
Marquette, Werner Michigan.


Photographer's Imprint

G.A. Werner,
Photographer
Gallery, Cor. Main and Third Sts.
Marquette, Mich.

Life Size Portraits in Ink, Water Color,
Pastel and Oil

Views Made of Residences

The 1889 Marquette City Directory lists G.A. Werner at the address displayed on the imprint. As of 1896, the Polk City and County Directory for Marquette Michigan lists Gustavus Werner at 115 S. 3d. May be the exact same studio, the city issuing building numbers between 1889 and 1896.

Also listed in the 1896 Directory is Fanny Holmes an artist working for G. A. Werner. Fanny also boards with her employer.

Photograph:

Woman With Note. Gustavus A. Werner. Unknown. Privately held by Anella Rogers, Woodinville, Washington. 2010.

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Wednesday, March 3, 2010

Give Their Face A Place - March 3



March is Women's History Month. Shades is honoring women within our families and communities by Giving Their Face A Place. March 3 is a photograph of another nameless woman.

Research has not been started on this photograph; what little information is known is included.

This photograph came from an album thought to once belong to the William Turcotte family. It is believed that Turcotte was born in Canada and moved to Michigan.



Unknown Women
Marquette, Werner Michigan.


Photographer's Imprint

G.A. Werner,
Photographer
Gallery, Cor. Main and Third Sts.
Marquette, Mich.

Life Size Portraits in Ink, Water Color,
Pastel and Oil

Views Made of Residences

The 1889 Marquette City Directory lists G.A. Werner at the address displayed on the imprint. As of 1896, the Polk City and County Directory for Marquette Michigan lists Gustavus Werner at 115 S. 3d. May be the exact same studio, the city issuing building numbers between 1889 and 1896.

Also listed in the 1896 Directory is Fanny Holmes an artist working for G. A. Werner. Fanny also boards with her employer.

Photograph:

Single Women In Lace. Gustavus A. Werner. Unknown. Privately held by Anella Rogers, Woodinville, Washington. 2010.

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Tuesday, March 2, 2010

Shedding Light On


A Wistful Woman Sending A Whist Postcard

In 1906 it was estimated that one person in every eight in the
United States purchased a picture postcard. There were
80,000 stores
handling them in the country in
1906 where there had
only been 100 the year before.


This is a commercial novelty embossed divided back photographic postcard. The couples on the front of the card are models. Nothing indicates the manufacturer of the card.



It is obvious that some things never change. Getting your husband to write you when he is away from home is obviously one of them. I am intrigued by postcards; these little snapshots in time. The sender and recipient hopefully knew what was meant by the correspondence, but we may never.

When The Postcard Was Mailed:

Winthrop, Minn.
3pm October 1910
Ben Franklin
U.S. Postage
Once Cent

Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), publisher, scientist, diplomat, and first postmaster general of the American colonies, is honored on the 1-cent stamp. This stamp was used most often to send postcards. The first 1-cent Franklin of the Third Bureau Issue (which this stamp corresponds to) rolled off the presses in the late fall of 1908. When retired, over 14 billion had been used. Smithsonian Postal Museum.

This postcard was mailed to:

Mr. Henry Walters
1126 - 2 ave South
Great Falls
Montana

The 1910 Census for Montana contains an entry for a Henry Walters. He is a single 28 year old copper miner boarding in Silver Bow County, Montana. Great Falls is in Cascade County, Montana.

This may or may not be the Henry Walters of our postcard. The card was mailed in October and the census taken in May. This would certainly allow enough time for Henry to marry. The census taker may have assumed he was single as he was a boarder in a boarding house. More information would be required to confirm this is our Henry.

The Correspondence Reads:

Well Dear how do you
like this card. I received
yours and was glad
to get it we are all
well and I hope
you are the same
and I wished you
would write to one
sometime love to
you ever your Wife

I found what the Wife has written very interesting. The kissing couples on the front are less than subtle. She is obviously missing her husband. In this message she acknowledges his card, but wishes he would write to her sometime. Did Henry send a card to the "all" mentioned? Is Wife living with Henry's parents and he wrote to them all rather than to his Wife? How I wish I knew.


What is Whist?

Whist is a trick-taking card game originating in the early 17th century which was played widely in the 18th and 19th centuries.

In the middle of the 18th century, whist was regularly played at the coffee houses of London and in fashionable society. By the late 19th century an elaborate and rigid set of rules detailing the laws of the game, its etiquette and the techniques of play, had been developed that took a large amount of study to master. In the early 20th century, bridge, which shares many traits with whist, displaced it as the most popular card game among many card players.

There are hundred of books written detailing the rules of the game and it's popularity. The woodcut below came from such a book and show that the game was so popular it was played during carriage travel.


Yes, I think we can all see why kissing is better than Whist!

Sources:

Anonymous. Better Than Playing Whist. Postcard. Unknown 1910.

Census:

1910 U.S. census,
Silver Bow County, Montana, population schedule, Silver Bow, p. 104, dwelling 283 , family 287, Eliza Pearl (Head); digital images. Ancestry.com (http://ancestry.com/ : retrieved 19 February 2010); citing NARA microfilm publication T624, roll 836.

Books:

Bogan, Robert. Real Photo Postcard Guide. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2006
Vaule, Rosamond B. As We Were - American Photographic Postcards, 1905 - 1930. Boston: David R. Godine, 2004.

Newspapers:

Anonymous. "Postcards For Every Use." The Sun. December 2, 1906. Online archives The Library of Congress : 2009.

For the Festival of Postcards - Light - February 2010.

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