Saturday, January 31, 2009

Scheduling Note:


TERRY THORNTON
The Graveyard Rabbit Retires!



The Weekend With Shades Column "The Graveyard Rabbit," by Terry Thornton, has retired. Thank you for a great column, Terry. You will be missed. Past Graveyard Rabbit Articles are archived here.




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Tuesday, January 27, 2009

A Photographer's Instructions

Twice Told Tuesday features a photography related article reprinted from
my collection of old photography books, magazines, and newspapers.


Were it not for the movie Cold Mountain I would always have envisioned those who have left behind their portraits as being dressed in shades of gray, black and white. These instructions from a photographer give us a hint as to what the actual color might have been. Some of the color names I was not familiar with, such as Bismarck and mazerine. A little research shows that Bismarck is a color of brown, mazerine is purple or perhaps a shade of blue. Now we all know.


How And When To Come For A Photograph
Year Unknown
Knapp Studios



The following suggestions will prove of interest we think to the patrons of the gallery. No better picture can be taken in a sunny than a cloudy day. The only difference is the exposure is a few seconds longer in a cloudy day; for that reason bring the little folks when the sun shines, and as near the middle of the day as possible tho' not to interfere with their accustomed nap - even though they are taken to a Knapp. Never threaten or coax a child to have his picture taken. Bring them to see the pictures and we will see to the rest.

Never come for a picture when in a hurry : the consequence is a tired and unnatural expression.

Come in the forenoon if possible : some come so late in the afternoon that when their turn comes it is too late to get a good picture.

Never comb the hair straight back, unless you wish to see a very high fore head represented. Crimped or frizzed hair always takes well.

We never object to face powder. It tends to help a picture.

The least move of the head destroys the sharpness of the picture. Do not swallow or move the mouth nor stare the eyes during the exposure. Wink as often as you feel it is necessary.

Try and have the thoughts about something different than sitting for a picture; something that will cause bright and intelligent expression.

No pictures taken on Sunday.

The following will guide in selecting colors : Snuff, golden and red brown, dark, light and apple green, wine color, dark orange, red and cherry take dark. Satin or navy blue, dawn color magenta, mazerine, blue, corn color, ashes of roses, rose pink, citrine pink, dove color, crimson, Quaker color, plum color, purple, stone color and buff take a kind of gray.

Leather color, slate color, garnet, light orange, light bismarck, claret, sea green and scarlett take a darker gray. Blue, purple, French blue, sky blue, lavender and lilac take a very white.

Some people think they cannot afford to have pictures taken. We wonder that they can afford not to have them. How often we hear it said, "I would give anything."

Source:

A slip of paper attached to a carte de visite in very poor condition. Year unknown. Face of card contains more information and a photograph of a woman wearing glasses. Very poorly done.

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Monday, January 26, 2009

Here's My Opinion


It is my opinion that the little girl is not dead.

So what could be the reason for why she looks as if she's sleeping other than that she is dead?

Sleeping, yes, but I believe it is illness. I believe she may be suffering from the disease Encephalitis lethargica, often called sleeping sickness, or a similar disease of the time. There was an epidemic of Encephalitis lethargica from around 1917 until 1928. Those who survived sank into a semi-conscious state. I also think I see signs of pain in her face, not the smooth face of death.

The clothing would place the photograph at about 1911. There is an electric chandelier, electric lights were common in homes after 1905. The child has a Teddy bear. They were introduced in 1903 and were mass produced by 1906.

So why is she the center of attention in the photograph? This may be a celebration. Perhaps it's the child's birthday. Even though she is ill, her parents may have dressed her in her best clothes, bought presents for her and placed them around her, and commemorated the occasion with a photograph. To me the toys look new and I'd love to know what's in the boxes. Chocolate?

All this is pure speculation.

Many children were removed from their coffins and placed in very peculiar situations to obtain a photograph. Often they were surrounded by family and their favorite toys. It was not unusual. But I still believe she is not dead and that this is an unusual photograph.

The following are the reasons why I think this is not a post-mortem photograph.

Although we can't see the entire table, the fruit is less than the substantial meal you would have expected friends and relatives to have brought to a viewing or funeral. Fruit was often difficult to acquire and signified celebrations. ie. The Christmas orange.

The Food

I find the cat in the photograph a little unsettling if the child is dead. Were my child alive, although ill, I would allow the cat to run around and might even find it a comfort. If my child were dead, I would remove the cat to another part of the house.

The poses of the people in the photograph are far too casual for something so serious as a family photograph commemorating a dead child.

Pose

The young woman pictured below is wearing a dress with a satin-like finish. The conventions of funeral dress would have precluded fabric of this sort being worn to a viewing or funeral. Even for families that were not wealthy certain customs were followed and I believe this would have been one of them. It is the type of dress that would be worn to a celebration.

Unconventional funeral dress

It has been suggested that the man casually posed above is wearing a mourning ribbon. I do not have a scan of a high enough resolution to really see the ribbon. The scan below looks more like a campaign ribbon, but there is no way to be sure.

Ribbon

My research into funeral customs found that a mourning ribbon for a child would have been white. This is not. Also, the other men in the photograph should have been wearing mourning ribbons as well. Particularly the man who appears to be the father; the man next to the flowers and directly behind the child. No other man is wearing a ribbon.

Also by convention, the flowers should have been white or light colored carnations if this was a viewing or funeral for a child. It is of course possible that white could not be found and any flowers were better than none.

Flowers

There are two things in the photograph, however, that cinched my opinion that she is not dead. The first, I call rampant smiling.

Smiling?

There are far too many people smiling for this to be a post-mortem photograph. While those who appear to be the parents are serious, they are not sorrowful. It is not a sorrowful group. None of the smiles appear to be attributable to the flash.

Serious - Not sorrowful

Women were very house proud during this time in history. While the piano remained piled high for a celebration with friends, if the house were to be used for a viewing for a dead child and people who were not close friends would be stopping by, I think they would have cleaned house.

What is on the piano? It looks like a guitar case and a violin and the piano has sheet music at the ready. More a celebration than a viewing.

So I am relying on the impression the photograph gives me, as many post-mortem photographs are staged very similarly to this one.

I sent these impressions on to Jack and here is what he replied:

"Thank you very much for taking the time to give your feedback on this photo. When I first purchased this, I had serious doubts about it being a post-mortem, and for obvious reasons, (the smiles being the main one)… but then, the more people I showed it to, the more I was getting the opinion that it was. In fact, I would say that out of the 20 or so comments I have received so far, 17 think it’s a post-mortem, which was very surprising to me. Now, after hearing your valued opinion, I am swayed once again to think that it is not.

You made some great observations. The thought of it being a sleeping sickness crossed my mind as well, actually, though I kept that to myself because I hadn’t taken any time to research it. The lack of the coffin did not factor much into my decision, as I own many “no doubt” post-mortem photos of children and adults posed as if sleeping, and many others of children posed with their favorite toys, much like the girl in this photo."

So what did you decide? Don't forge to leave your comment.

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Sunday, January 25, 2009

Welcome To




APPEALING SUBJECTS
BY CRAIG MANSON
A Monthly - Weekend With Shades - Column






By now, everybody is just about adjusted to writing "2009" on their checks and other documents, I hope. I know that you have been waiting with excited anticipation for the big anniversary this year--yes, of course, I'm talking about the 100th anniversary of the Copyright Act of 1909! That law is no longer in effect, but its arm still reaches from the legislative graveyard to affect issues yet today. So I thought the first "Appealing Subjects" of 2009 should deal with copyright issues (and I've found a few old photographs of the United States Patent Office just for fun).

Let's start with one of my favorite subjects: orphans!

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Thursday, January 22, 2009

A Shot - Part III

THE BOTCHED BURIAL

When last we read of Goldenson, he was swaying to and fro in the Hangman's noose with the photograph of Mamie Kelly clutched in his hand.

After the body had hung on the scaffolding for eighteen minutes (to insure death had occurred), it was cut down by the deputies and placed in a rough wood coffin to be transported to the morgue. The coffin was loaded into the hearse outside the jailhouse door. Ten thousand people had stood in the streets outside the jail for the hanging and many of them followed the hearse as it drove rapidly to the morgue.

An autopsy was conducted showing that death was instantaneous; the spinal cord having been severed and the second vertebrae fractured. An examination of the brain showed it to be normal.

Once the examination was complete Goldenson's remains were transported to his parents home. It was written that while his mother was moaning and crying over his body newsboys paraded up and down in front of the house crying "all about the Goldenson hanging."

Sunday afternoon, 16 September 1888, Father Fassanotti arrived at the Goldenson's home to take charge of Aleck's burial in the Catholic cemetery, the same cemetery where Mamie Kelly had been buried.

On the night before the hanging, Goldenson had been baptized into the Catholic faith. For some months Goldenson and Father Fassanotti had discussed Goldenson's conversion to the Catholic faith, but it had been slow to happen for two reasons. The first was that Father Fassanotti believed in hell and Aleck did not. This was the subject of several heated arguments between the two. The second reason was that Goldenson's mother, Rebecca had threatened to committ suicide if Aleck converted. When Aleck was baptized he asked the Father to keep the information secret from his mother as long as possible.

So why did Goldenson convert to Catholicism at the eleventh hour? It wasn't his friendship with Father Fassanotti, or faith, but rather his desire to spend eternity with Mamie Kelly. He must have thought he had a better chance from the Catholic Cemetery. When being pursued in the jail by the lovely young woman from Salt Lake City, Goldenson make it clear that he believed he would regain Mamie beyond the limits of life and that the two would walk the endless paths of eternity hand in hand.

Just prior to his baptism Aleck revealed to Father Fassanotti that he intended to commit suicide prior to the hanging. Aleck had in his possession a gelatine capsule containing 10 grains of cyanide potassium, an amount sufficient to kill twenty men. The priest did not relieve the condemned man of the poison, but rather told him that based on his act of conversion he would trust Goldenson's word that he would honor his faith. As we know, Goldenson did not take the poison, turning it over to the Sheriff and a jailer the morning of his execution. (The prison doctor was the focus of an inquiry regarding this incident. He was found to have done nothing wrong.)

The Goldenson family refused to release Aleck's body to Father Fassannotti for a Catholic burial. The Father withdrew his permit for the body to be buried in the Catholic cemetery.

The Goldensons then made an application to the Jewish cemetery for burial, but those in charge would not permit the burial of the body of Aleck Goldenson in Jewish ground, as he had embraced the Catholic faith prior to his death.

The family then secured a lot in the Odd Fellows cemetery. The burial took place without the benefit of service. Not Catholic, not Jewish, not Protestant.

Was this an omen of what was to come? Was there something missing?

THE MISSING BRAIN

In a twist of fate, Aleck Goldenson's body had been returned to his family by Coroner Stanton minus Aleck's brain. During the autopsy, Stanton removed Goldenson's brain and kept it for investigation. He felt it was in the public interest to study the brain in order to refute any claim of Goldenson's insanity that might be made in the future.

Both the City Attorney and District Attorney refused to defend Coroner Stanton. The court held it was the duty of the coroner to deliver the body to the family whole after the inquest. The brain was returned to the family, but there was no account of the burial of the brain. What this story doesn't tell us is how the Goldenson family discovered that the brain was missing almost two months after it had been buried. Did someone talk? And this wasn't the end of Rebecca Goldenson's time in court.

The Goldenson's sued the City of San Francisco for damages alleged to have been inflicted on their property by a mob during the excitement over the murder of Mamie Kelly. They claimed $3,725.70.

The Goldensons were again in court in February of 1889. It seems a man named Simon Hamberg induced Mrs. Goldenson to let him have 101 pictures and drawings made by Aleck while in jail. Hamberg sent them to Schussler Brothers in San Francisco to be framed for exhibition, but failed to pay Schussler Brothers for their work. They retained the pictures and drawings. Rebecca was suing to get the pictures back and Hamberg was convicted of swindling. I could find no disposition of Rebecca's case.

Aleck was known for creating many drawings and writings while in jail. Many people wanted his autograph and he was always eager to comply. Deputy Sheriff Robert McCord while on death watch asked Goldenson for his autograph.

"Certainly, Bob," replied the condemned man good-naturedly. "I'll compose an original poem for you, too."

Suiting the action to the word, he sat down to his little table, and after thinking for awhile, began to write.

"There you are, Bob," he said, as he finished writing. "now, that's original."

The rhyme was written in a steady, legible hand and the signature comprised many flourishes. Following is what he wrote:

To Rob M'Cord:

As now I live,
My life is a death's annoy;
But when I'm dead,
My death will be a life's joy.

ALECK GOLDENSON.
SEPTEMBER 13, 1888.
THE LAST MORNING.


THE NUMBER FOURTEEN

Much has been written about Goldenson's obsession with coincidences around the number 14; similar to Walter Sparrow the character in the movie The Number 23. To have the matter stated correctly for posterity, Goldenson prepared the following:

-- My first Sunday in jail was Sunday, November 14, 1886.
-- Add the letters of the Christian names Alexander and Mamie and you have fourteen.
-- The same result is obtained by adding the number of letters in the surnames Kelly and Goldenson.
-- The names of the attorneys who lost my case by deserting me each contains fourteen letters.
-- I was fourteen months in solitary confinement.
-- Mamie Kelly's age was 14 years (he omits to say fourteen when he killed her),
-- my trial commenced February 14, 1887.
-- There are fourteen letters in the surnames Cook and Campbell, Jr., the names of the attorneys who defended me.
-- Judge Murphy first passed sentence of death on me on April 14, 1887.
-- I was finally sentenced to hang September 14, 188.
-- My name as I sign it contains fourteen letters.

Aleck Goldenson

This would account for Goldenson's reaction when sentenced to hang on September 14. He uttered an oath, leaned over to his attorney and said, "I told you so."

In a cruel twist of fate, Goldenson was transferred to Cell 41 the day before he was hung. Fourteen backwards. Rather fitting don't you think?


WAS MOTHER WHEATON JUST A COLORFUL STORY?



In Prisons and Prayers, a biography written by Mrs. Elizabeth R. Wheaton, she gives this extract from a Baltimore paper, January, 1907, concerning Alexander Goldenson.

SPIRITUAL ADVISOR OF FAMOUS CRIMINALS

Work of "Mother" Wheaton In Prisons All Over The Land


For twenty years Mrs. Wheaton has been traveling throughout the United States, Europe, Canada and Mexico, working among prisoners in hundreds of prisons and penitentiaries. On a number of occasions she has converted criminals under death sentence. She has preached in the Maryland Penitentiary.

Mrs. Wheaton came to Baltimore direct from Ohio, where she had been holding prayer in the cells of the state prison with eight men condemned to die she was in San Francisco a number of years ago when Alexander Goldenson killed his sweetheart, Mamie Kelly, and after Goldenson had been tried, convited and sentenced to death "Mother" Wheaton prayed with him for forty days. The day of the execution, September 14, 1888, he was converted through her instrumentality, and just before walking to the gallows she tied her silk handkerchief about the condemned man's neck.



Perhaps the Baltimore reporter never read the San Francisco newspapers during the two years there were almost daily articles about Goldenson. Perhaps "Mother" Wheaton had issued a press release to the reporter or given an interview. Perhaps her perception of the time she spent with Goldenson was markedly different than the reality. Perhaps a story just gets better over time. Mother Wheaton, didn't correct the article and even used it in her biography.

Is there evidence that "Mother Wheaton" actually spent time with Goldenson on death row and that any of her claims were based on fact.

On the day of Goldenson's hanging the San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin reported that two evangelists who had visited him for several months were there that morning. They were not named, but were referred to as "the Sisters." They sang and prayed with the prisoner for several hours. Goldenson's favorite songs were listed as "Where is My Wandering Boy Tonight," "Meet Me There," and "Jesus Hallelujah."

Upon leaving, the elder Sister (Mother Wheaton?) had tears in her eyes and left Goldenson with these parting words, "Rest quietly and try to think of yourself as you are and may God bless you."

Once they were gone Goldenson laughingly imitated their singing. "That's pretty good for a fellow with one foot in the grave, isn't it," he remarked with tears of laughter rolling down his cheeks.

It is well documented in the newspapers that Father Francotti baptized Goldenson into the Catholic faith and no documentation that "Mother Wheaton" was the instrumentality.

It is also well documented that Goldenson was not wearing a handkerchief around his neck when he went to the gallows. It was a collar and tie that he himself removed to place the noose around his neck. It is also well documented that "Mother Wheaton" was not there when he walked to the gallows as she had left earlier that morning.

There is mention of a handkerchief in Goldenson's pocket, but no mention of who had given it to him.

So it looks as if the prison advocate, "Mother Wheaton," may have been padding her resume or the San Francisco newspapers did not find her as colorful or interesting as she found herself.

THE CABINET CARD

Mamie Kelly
Mary Elizabeth Kelly
First Communion
Photograph
ca. 1885



J! M! J!
MAMMA! RELATIVES! FRIENDS!
ALL YE AGONIZING HEARTS!
FORGIVE MY SLAYER
As I do! and pray for
Mamie Kelly
of 22 Hayes Street
Born , 23 September, 1873
S. F. CAL.
Shot, 10 November, 1886
N. E. Cor. POLK STREET AND ASH AVE.
Truth Justice Mercy


Now back to the photograph that started it all; the true mystery. The photograph was purchased in an online auction, the only bidder, I won the photograph for a rock bottom price. This probably stemmed from a faulty seller's description. A cursory inspection of the photograph finds it to be an ordinary communion photograph of a young girl of the time period. The description being faulty, most bidders would not read past the first three lines. Below is the faulty description:

This brochure opens to 8 panels: Front with photo of church and a listing of George Washington and Robert E Lee's Pews. Nest panal gives history of building the church. Next panal is History of George Washington and the church. Next panal is Robert E Lee and the church. Next panal speaks of Organs Chandelier Halls Tombstones in the Cemetary and the history of the church in the war between the stat I don't know the name of the type so this could be miscatagorized. It seems like your average photo of 1886. Then the interesting part is on the back. It asks for forgiveness for her slayer and says she was shot on Nov 10 1886. Bid high as this is being sold to save my home.

I read the description to the end and was curious about the forgiveness for the person who shot her. It is a typical communion photograph of the 1880s, with a twist. I also collect a category of photograph I describe as "weird, strange, or unusual. " The communion/memorial photograph of Mamie Kelly fit that category and held quite a story.

At the time of Mamie's funeral the stamped religious information was added to the reverse of the photograph so that it would function as a memorial card.

What does it all mean? J!M!J! stands for Jesus, Mary Joseph. The heart at the bottom on the left that has both the crown of thorns and the flame above it is known as the Sacred Heart of Jesus. I am not Catholic, but it appears there is a Litany of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and this may have been said at Mamie's funeral. There are also twelve promises associated with the Sacred Heart some of which are peace to the family, consolation in their troubles, refuge in death. All of which would be appropriate for a funeral.

The heart pictured on the right pierced by the sword is the Immaculate Heart of Mary. Its significance appears to be intersession with Christ and a shared sorrow. Also appropriate for a mourning card. With special thanks to Donna Pointkouski, What's Past Is Prologue, for her knowledge and research.

Truth, Justice, and Mercy are found in Psalm 85:10, as the foundational elements of reconciliation offering peace. Appropriate under the circumstances of Mamie's death. The term agonizing hearts is found in many of the eulogies of this time period referring to the friends and family left behind and is therefore not unusual. The card appears to encourage Christian charity toward Mamie's murderer.

There are several mysteries associated with the cabinet card, however. Who was the photographer? Normally an imprint would be found at the bottom of the front of the photograph. Here instead we have a facsimile of Mamie's signature. A photographer's imprint might also be found on the reverse of the card, but the card was blank and stamped with the memorial information.

As Maureen Taylor has suggested in a recent article, perhaps a comparison of the background in this photograph to the backgrounds used by the photographers in San Francisco during this period of time might be helpful. But backgrounds were commercially sold and purchased by many photographers. As I don't have access to photographs of all the photographers in business in San Francisco at that time (there were many) this would not be helpful. Also, any photographer in the city might have made a copy of the original photograph to produce this memorial card.

Who paid for the photograph used as a memorial card? In my discussions with Donna, she remarked that it was probably not something the church would have paid for. In the Dicy Cannon article, Shades discussed the fact that memorial cards generally were the function of the mortuary or a mail-order service to the family. The funeral happened very quickly too quickly for mail-order and the memorial card was not the type normally available by mail. The newspaper articles described the body as having been taken from the autopsy directly to the Kelly home, no mortuary is mentioned. The mortuary may have facilitated this for the family, but it could not have accomplished it without the family's assistance.

Note the signature of Mamie Kelly on the front of the photograph. Mamie may have autographed one for a friend or family member and the photographer used that photograph to accomplish the copy you see here. I believe the memorial photograph was most probably produced by the family.

At first, I questioned how the family could afford to pay for the photograph knowing the number of people who attended the service and would have wanted a copy of the memorial. However, the Daily Evening Bulletin wrote an article about the token of Mrs. Kelly's gratitude to the prosecutor, Mr. Regensberger, for his prosecution and conviction of Goldenson. The token was a large plush covered arm chair, a very expensive item. I found no information concerning the origin of the photograph in my research.

The real questions are "How did Aleck Goldenson obtain the photograph that he took to the gallows tied to his wrist. Was it a memorial photograph or was it the original communion photograph?" Now that's a mystery I'd love to solve!

THE SERIES

Shades Starts The Year With A Bang
Make That A Shot







SOURCE:


Books:

Duke, Thomas S. Celebrated Criminal Cases of America. Tabor, San Francisco: The James H. Barry Co., 1910. Also available online at http://books.google.com/.


McCarty, L. P. The Annual Statistician and Economist. San Francisco: Pacific Press, 1892. Also available online at http://books.google.com/.


O'Brien, Robert. This is San Francisco. New York: Whittlesey House, 1948.
Also available online at http://books.google.com/.

Wheaton, Elizabeth (Ryder). Prisons and Prayer: Or A Labor of Love. Tabor, Iowa: Chas. M. Kelley, 1906. Also available online at http://books.google.com/.


Email:


Poinkowski, Donna. "Response to questions on Mamie Kelly Memorial Card." E-mail message to footnoteMaven, January 2009.

Newspapers:

Unknown. "Yesterday Murder." Daily Evening Bulletin, 11 November 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Irritated by Her Importunities." St. Louis Globe-Democrat, 11 November 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Killed a School Girl." Morning Oregonian, 11 November 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Cold-Blooded Murder." Daily Evening Bulletin, 12 November 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Crime and Casualties." The Atchison Daily Champion, 13 November 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "The Tumult Last Night." Daily Evening Bulletin, 13 November 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "A Mob Repulsed " St. Louis Globe-Democrat, 13 November 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Tried To Lynch Him." Daily Evening Bulletin, 13 November 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "The Recent Murder." The Milwaukee Sentinel, 11 November 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "A Mild Mannered Mob." Daily Evening Bulletin, 13 November 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Lynchers Foiled." The News and Observer, 14 November 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Mamie Kelly's Murderer " The Galveston Daily News, 14 November 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Murdered Mamie Kelly." The Daily Inter Ocean, 14 November 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Tried To Lynch Him." The Milwaukee Sentinel, 14 November 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "The Mamie Kelly's Murder." The Milwaukee Sentinel, 14 November 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Goldenson In Court." Daily Evening Bulletin
, 18 November 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Crime In Frisco." The Los Angeles Times
, 21 November 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "The Goldenson Case." Daily Evening Bulletin
, 23 November 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Arraigned." Daily Evening Bulletin
, 24 November 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "The Case of Goldenson In Police Court." Daily Evening Bulletin
, 26 November 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Goldenson's Defense." Daily Evening Bulletin
, 1 December 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "The Goldenson Case." Daily Evening Bulletin
, 4 December 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Mamie Kelly's Murderer." The Los Angeles Times
, 5 December 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Goldenson's Case." Daily Evening Bulletin
, 7 December 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Commissioner's Appointed." Daily Evening Bulletin
, 9 December 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Awaiting Trial." Daily Evening Bulletin
, 11 December 1886. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Goldenson's Crime." Daily Evening Bulletin
, 6 January 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "The Status of the Goldenson Case." Daily Evening Bulletin
, 17 January 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "The Goldenson Case." Daily Evening Bulletin
, 8 February 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "The Goldenson Case." Daily Evening Bulletin, 14 February 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "The Goldenson Case." Daily Evening Bulletin, 16 February 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "No More Delays." The Los Angeles Times, 17 February 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "The Prisoner Refuses To Talk." Daily Evening Bulletin
, 18 February 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Judge Murphy Insists That The Trial Must Proceed." Daily Evening Bulletin, 21 February 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "The Slayer of Mamie Kelly At Last Brought To Trial." The Los Angeles Times, 22 February 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "The Work Of Impaneling The Jury." Daily Evening Bulletin, 23 February 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Only Part Of The Trial Jury Secured." Daily Evening Bulletin, 24 February 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "An Attempt To Resume The Impaneling of Jurors." Daily Evening Bulletin, 25 February 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Objections Introduced By Counsel." Daily Evening Bulletin, 7 March 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Testimony Taken." Daily Evening Bulletin, 8 March 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Misguided Men." Los Angeles Times, 8 March 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Written Statement Made By Defendent." Daily Evening Bulletin, 9 March 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Outline By Counsel of The Claim." Daily Evening Bulletin, 10 March 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "The Taking Of Testimony." Daily Evening Bulletin, 11 March 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "A Murder's Relatives In Contempt." St. Louis-Globe Democrat, 11 March 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Deuprey Answers." Daily Evening Bulletin, 15 March 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Evidence Introduced To Show Prisoner's Mental Condition." Daily Evening Bulletin, 17 March 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Objections Introduced By Counsel." Daily Evening Bulletin, 7 March 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "No Title." The Idaho Avalanche, 19 March 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Beginning Of The End." Daily Evening Bulletin, 25 March 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "No Title." Los Angeles Times, 26 March 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Goldenson Convicted." The Atchison Daily Globe, 29 March 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Murder In The First Degree." The Milwaukee Sentinel, 29 March 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Goldenson Guilty." The Los Angeles Times, 29 March 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Guilty of Murder in the First Degree." Bangor Daily Whig & Courier, 30 March 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "CONVICTION." Los Angeles Times, 30 March 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Goldenson." Los Angeles Times, 31 March 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "San Francisco Criminals." The Los Angeles Times, 3 April 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Motion For A New Trial." Daily Evening Bulletin, 9 April 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Goldenson Wants A New Trial." The Los Angeles Times
, 10 April 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Latest News Items." Daily Evening Bulletin, 11 April 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Goldenson To Hang." Daily Evening Bulletin, 14 April 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Good-bye Goldenson." Bismark Daily Tribune, 15 April 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Goldenson's Doom." The Los Angeles Times, 15 April 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Goldenson's Appeal." The Los Angeles Times, 24 April 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Gift From Mrs. Kelly." Daily Evening Bulletin, 25 April 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Gift From Mrs. Kelly." Daily Evening Bulletin, 25 April 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "A Lease Of Life To Assassins
." Morning Oregonian, 27 May 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Goldenson's Appeal." Daily Evening Bulletin, 5 July 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Set For Trial." Daily Evening Bulletin, 27 September 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "The Unusual Criminal Activity At San Francisco." The Los Angeles Times, 5 November 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Jury Fixers." The Los Angeles Times, 25 April 1887. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Misplaced Pity." The Idaho Avalanche, 28 April 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Goldenson Must Hang." Morning Oregonian, 26 May 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "He Will Hang." The Los Angeles Times, 26 May 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Multiple News Items." The Idaho Avalanche, 2 June 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Goldenson Asks For a Writ." Daily Evening Bulletin, 28 June 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Goldenson's Last Hope Gone." Morning Oregonian, 10 July 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Multiple News Items." Daily Evening Bulletin, 12 July 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Events In Californias." Morning Oregonian, 12 July 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Multiple News Items." The Los Angeles Times, 12 July 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Goldenson's Fate." Daily Evening Bulletin, 14 July 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Multiple News Items." Daily Evening Bulletin, 21 July 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Goldenson's Fatal Day." Daily Evening Bulletin, 23 July 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Goldenson's Death Warrant Signed." Los Angeles Times, 25 July 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Goldenson's Denial." Daily Evening Bulletin, 17 August 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "A Death Watch For Goldenson." Morning Oregonian, 29 August 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Guarding Goldenson
." Los Angeles Times, 29 August 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "A Shrewd Move." Daily Evening Bulletin, 7 September 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "The Sheriff Preparing For His Execution." Daily Evening Bulletin, 12 September 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "The End." Daily Evening Bulletin, 14 September 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Extra Hanged!" Daily Evening Bulletin, 14 September 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "To Hang Today." The Los Angeles Times, 14 September 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Not Afraid of Death." Morning Oregonian, 15 September 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "A Young Murderer Executed." Rocky Mountain News, 15 September 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Goldenson Hanged." The Atchison Daily Globe, 15 September 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Goldenson Hanged." The Milwaukee Sentinel, 15 September 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Goldenson's Faith." The Los Angeles Times, 16 September 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Without Rites." Los Angeles Times, 17 September 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Goldenson's Brain." Daily Evening Bulletin, 14 November 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Unknown. "Goldenson's Pictures." Daily Evening Bulletin, 7 September 1888. Online archives King County Library Infotrac Gale Group - Subscription. http://infotrac.galegroup.com : 2009.

Photograph:


Mamie Kelly. San Francisco, CA. Cabinet Card. 1886. Privately held by the footnoteMaven, Preston, Washington. 2009.

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Monday, January 19, 2009

No Shot Part III Today



There is no Part III to Shades Starts The Year With A Bang - Make That A Shot due to the temperature.

Mine!

Tune In Tomorrow.

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Sunday, January 18, 2009

Welcome To





CAPTURED MOMENTS
BY JASIA
A Monthly - Weekend With Shades - Column






One of the most popular scrapbooking projects family historians like to tackle is creating a heritage album. A heritage album consists of a collection of scrapbook pages that tell the story of your heritage in photos and journaling. The collection may include bios of individuals on your family tree, treasured family recipes, topical pages such as graduations, vacations, or holidays, the family home(s), weddings, pets, reunions, etc. These are a lot of fun to do but like any big project they take some planning.



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Thursday, January 15, 2009

The Carnivals In Town

9th EDITION

Smile For The Camera ~ A Carnival of Images


There is no shortage of photographs that were not properly identified by our ancestors or the photograph's owner. The following submissions to Smile show us that everyone could use a little help in identifying these people. Who Are They? We'd All Like To Know.

So, put on your detective glasses, open the cover and browse the 9th Edition of Smile For The Camera's album of unknowns!

— ¤ — ¤ —

Wendy Littrell of All My Branches Genealogy introduces us to an unknown little boy in Who Are You (Tell Me - Who Are You)? Follow Wendy as she narrows down the possibilities as to who this little boy in the photograph with her grandfather could be. Perhaps the answer is staring right back at her in some other photos that she owns. Complete with an introduction by "The Who".

— ¤ —

Robert Baca asks "Who are You? I Really Want to Know." This is an encore presentation that didn't get the response Robert had hoped they would the first time. By posting them again at The Baca / Douglas Genealogy and Family History Blog it's hoped someone out there will have a clue. Do you?

— ¤ —

Jessica Oswalt presents Who Are They? posted at Jessica's Genejournal. More mysteries from Jessica's great aunt's photograph album. Are they friends? Are they relatives? Take a look!

— ¤ —

A very handsome man and beautiful women, Amir Dekel of I Dream of Genea(logy) has so many unknown photographs that he really didn't know where to start. So he chose the 4 that seemed the most interesting in I Dream of Genea(logy): Who are you people?!? And they are interesting.

— ¤ —

Lee Drew has a Most Wanted page at Famhist. What a great idea! Lee has boxes of old photos of unknown people that were inherited. A common problem for any genealogist. Some of the photos are posted at the bottom of the Most Wanted page at Most Wanted: Famhist.

— ¤ —

Sheri Fenley presents Three Unknowns posted at The Educated Genealogist. Sheri tells us, "In my entire collection of family photos, I have only three that are UFP's (unidentified family photos). Maybe they belong to your family? " Only three?

— ¤ —

Terry Thornton presents Who Are You? I Really Want to Know . . . posted at Hill Country of Monroe County, Mississippi. A mystery lad on a horse and a mystery man on a horse --- and the horse may be the same in each photograph --- are but two family pictures without labels in sad need of identification.

— ¤ —

Apple presents Nameless Faces posted at Apple's Tree. "I admit it, Apple says. "I cheated on this one as these pictures have all been featured in the past. But I really would love to know who they are and I hope that by moving them out of my archive I may make a connection." Not cheating! It's called recycling - you're a Green Apple!

— ¤ —

Julie Cahill Tarr presents Only 4 Elusive Photos Remain posted at GenBlog. After a holiday visit with family, Julie is left with only FOUR unknowns. Only four? But they are difficult ones, babies and children - take a look.

— ¤ —

Amanda Erickson presents Who are you? posted at Random Ramblings. The identification of one out of eight people provides a clue, but can you identify that chicken? It was important enough to someone to get it in that photograph.

— ¤ —

Taylorstales presents Who Are You? posted at Taylorstales-Genealogy. An ethnic wedding dress with few clues. A search for C. F. Kersting, the Chicago Photographer on the cabinet card, found he operated at 488 Milwaukee during the year 1893. It appears this was the only year Kersting operated a photographic studio on his own. This should narrow your time frame. I'd love to see the reverse of this card.

— ¤ —

Dru Pair presents Granddaddy’s People posted at Find Your Folks. This picture has been in the photo album of Dru's maternal grandparents ever since she can remember. Dru wants to know who the people are in the photo that belonged to her maternal grandfather. We hope you find the answer!

— ¤ —

Lidian presents The Virtual Dime Museum: The Instant Ancestor posted at The Virtual Dime Museum. An instant ancestor for our Victorian Sleuth. Lidian's subject is wearing a beautiful dress and Lidian gives us a look at corsets and bustles of the period. The photographer of this cabinet card could be a clue to its date. He may be found in the Connecticut Historical Society's, “The Connecticut Yankee and the Camera: 1839-1889” by William F. Robinson, which contains an Index of Connecticut Photographers; alphabetic and by town.

— ¤ —

Cherie Atkinson Clark presents Smile for the Camera: Who are you? posted at Still Digging for Roots. Two photos found among my grandparents' possessions, Cherie tells us. Cherie's first photograph is a Victorian interior and it is loaded with clues. Fashion, many photographs within the photograph, an organ, and a piano. What a photograph! This one could be a lot of fun!

— ¤ —

JoLyn Day introduces us to Aunt Priscilla's Sewing Class posted at The Mount Timpanogos Graveyard Rabbit. The two photographs are a glimpse into the daily life of 1911. They are magnificent, JoLyn. The Logan, Utah, newspapers for 1911 might mention the sewing class and give the names of the unidentified members.

— ¤ —

Sheri Bush is calling all cousins for the Brock Photo Mystery posted at TwigTalk. Sheri needs help identifying the two seated adults in this photograph. Just one question. Was Francis Marion Brock a lot older than his wife Irene? This man looks much more in the age range of the seated woman. Also the woman standing and the woman seated have very similar cheeks. Mother & daughter?

— ¤ —

Do you know Jack? John Newmark hopes you do. A 1919 summer romance, perhaps marriage? John would like to find Jack, posted at TransylvanianDutch. This one will take a lot of research unless YOU have the answer. Take a look, we all want to know.

— ¤ —

Paula Ausmus Moore gives us a glimpse of her favorite semi-hidden mother photograph. My favorite photo posted at A Passage in time. These little boys come from the McKell family from Spanish Fork, Utah. Who they are Paula doesn't know for sure. They look well dressed and well mannered as does their faithful dog.

— ¤ —

Kathy Brady-Blake, gives us another clue to Who are you Baby Raymond? at Kathy's Genealogy Blog. We now know that Baby Raymond came to the Shriner's Hospital in Chicago from North Dakota. Kathy really wants this one solved. Stop by and see if you can help.

— ¤ —

Linda Stienstra (From Axer to Ziegler) has a photograph of twelve unidentified people at I Think They Belong ~ I Just Don?t Know How!! She also had a good list of questions. Why the tablecloths? If it was a traveling photographer they sometimes hung them as a backdrop. Or perhaps they covered the glare from windows. We can only speculate. Linda, is there an embossed stamp on the back of the card mount?

— ¤ —

Donna Pointkouski wants to know Who are These Guys? (And Where are They Going?) posted at What's Past is Prologue. Yes, Donna, that's exactly how I would start. Some other clues - gas lamps used in conjunction with headlights; the end of the use of the word Livery in place of garage. All can be found. Looks like pretty desolate territory. Is there a clue there?

— ¤ —

Tex presents Who Are You? I Really Want to Know! posted at All My Ancestors. I was very taken with these gentlemen the first time I laid eyes on them and with the addition of the second photograph they have become twice as interesting. Both photographs appear to have the same background, but I agree two different side kicks. The furniture and floor does not look like that of a studio photographer, even in Texas, so you may be looking at a traveling photographer.

— ¤ —

Lester Larrabee of the "Bits and Pieces" Blog has a very intriguing photograph he's submitting to Smile called "I wish you could speak." His photograph contains a clue on the reverse of the card mount. An embossed trade mark. A clue I am now chasing, as it may solve more than one mystery for me. Thanks Les for all the assistance. We may actually find a date range for this photograph.

— ¤ —

Colleen presents Whooooooo..... Are You .... OOOhhhh Oooh... posted at Orations of OMcHodoy. This is complicated, and Colleen obviously needs the services of NCIS or CSI face recognition software. One woman, two women, or three women? She really wants to know. Me too.

— ¤ —

Susan Edminster presents Aunt Ura Who are You? I really want to know! Aunt Ura, a beautiful portrait of a very dignified woman. Don't you love it when our ancestors make an identification, but one only they can understand? See what a fine mess Sue's identification has gotten her into at The Family File.

— ¤ —

Tim Agazio presents Who is This Guy? Tim's not so sure he'd like to claim a relationship with this young man, but I can't resist a man in a tie. The flag looks as if it was being used as a backdrop. The question I'd like answered is "What was the occasion." Tim asks "who are these people" often at Genealogy Reviews Online. Drop by and see what you can come up with.

— ¤ —

Amy Coffin shows us a lovely photograph, Who Are You? 9th Edition of Smile for the Camera, posted at We Tree. "This wedding party photo captured a happy time in the subjects' lives. Why does it make me so sad," Amy asks? Could it be the lack of identification? Everyone in this picture has polished their shoes. Even those shoes that had some wear. There's real pride in this photograph. Got any suggestions for finding out who these people might be? Let's cheer Amy up!

— ¤ —

Donna M. Moughty presents Who Are You? I Really Want To Know! posted at Donna's Genealogy Blog. Don't leave your descendants with the same problems. Identify all those pictures you took over the holidays, Donna says. We're on the Amen Row for this one.

— ¤ —

Jasia posts Who is This Couple?, a wedding photograph with one of the most beautiful yet simple bouquets I've seen in a photograph this old, at Creative Gene. The photographer Sowinski came from Poland and lived and worked in Detroit for 66 years. His clients were mostly from the Polish community of Detroit. 66 years doesn't help narrow the time period, but if you could match his imprint to a specific year that could narrow the search. Jasia, you're an expert at directories and that's the first place I'd start. Good luck!

— ¤ —

Janice Tracy of Attala County Memories has a postcard of "Five Men from Helena Arkansas" and would like to know just how they fit into her family. Janice, do you know that the back of the postcard can be dated even without a stamp or postmark? It could narrow the time span. Was Vertie in Helena, Arkansas, and are you certain the notation meant the men were from there?

— ¤ —

Craig Manson, GeneaBloggie, has found the photograph of a handsome young man he can't place titled "Who Is This Man?" It was with many other photographs depicting members of the Micheau family of Prairie du Rocher and Sparta, Illinois. Craig, just below the oval on the right side and at an angle, is that the name of a photographer? It looks like Dunker Studio, but I can't quite make it out. Can you? Or am I just seeing things?

— ¤ —

Greta Koehl's submission 9th Edition of Smile for the Camera: Who Are You? I Really Want to Know posted at Greta's Genealogy Bog, is a two-fer. Greta tells us, "Judy Shubert of Genealogy Traces and I are doing a joint submission - we have a mystery we are trying to solve that may involve some connection between our families - perhaps friendship. If there was no connection, there certainly are a lot of coincidences." Spooky!

— ¤ —

Lorine McGinnis Schulze of Olive Tree Genealogy asks the question, Are You My Grandfather? Lorine believes she can identify two of four men and a boy pictured in the photograph. But like us all, she wants to know for sure. Does anyone recognize these three individuals? Can you help?

— ¤ —

Msteri presents Who Are You? posted at Heritage Happens.... This photograph is posed in the typical family arrangement. Mother and father sitting with two daughters standing. Photographs such as these commemorated an event, perhaps Della coming to visit before her confinement. Is that the name of the photographer at the bottom of the photograph. If it is, it's always a good place to start.

— ¤ —

Kathryn Lake Hogan presents us with a charming photograph of six beautiful little girls and asks Who Are You? I Really Wanna Know! posted at LOOKING4ANCESTORS. Kathryn asks all the correct questions in dating her photograph. The photographer H. S. Eades, 91, Wednesbury Road, Walsall can be found conducting business in the Staffordshire, England, Directory of 1912. Your date may be correct, Kathryn.

— ¤ —

M. Diane Rogers presents Who Are You? I Really Want To Know! 9th Edition, Smile For The Camera - KAUFMANN, TRAGLING, SAMKS posted at CanadaGenealogy, or, 'Jane's Your Aunt'. Wow, what a great old postcard and Diane has identified the photographer, those pictured, and where and to whom it was going to be sent. But what she really wants to know is who are they and what was their journey? So do I!

— ¤ —

Janet Iles, Janet The Researcher, really wants to know who came to the Quilting Bee at the Love farm on 8 August 1908? This is one of those Edwardian women in white photographs. So many unidentified women, what a shame. You have a great clue Janet, what was the local newspaper for this area? They often reported Quilting Bees and those that attended.

— ¤ —

Carol Wilkerson presents Weekly Genealogy Blogging Prompt #1 posted at iPentimento | Genealogy and More. Two scarce family mementos. Carol has done a lot of research and been rewarded with important family information. Go see "Who They Are."

— ¤ —

Miriam Robbins Midkiff presents Who Are You? A CROTHERS Family Member? posted at AnceStories: The Stories of My Ancestors. A photo of a mystery woman from the CROTHERS photo collection. As Miriam attempted to date the photograph, she came up with a new theory as to her identity! And those footnotes, a thing of beauty!

— ¤ —

Holly Timm, of genealogy musings, has a very tough, who are you... photograph. A handsome well dressed young man in a box of papers written in German. There is absolutely no idea as to who he might be. How did his photograph get in the box, did he really come from Iowa? Your help is needed on this one. All suggestions appreciated.

— ¤ —

Diana Ritchie presents 9th Edition Smile for the Camera: Who are You? posted at Random Relatives. This is a tintype of an unknown man, possibly from the SAURER or FLORY side of Diana's family. I think there is a definite resemblance between the two photographs that Diana has posted. What do you think?

— ¤ —

Becky Wiseman, of kinexxions, submits Little Darlings! Who are you? to Smile. Becky has a dating problem where she used the newspapers to find answers, but not in the conventional manner. Check out those little darlings in the newspapers. The clues are everywhere!

— ¤ —

Lori Thornton introduces us to Who Are Marie's Friends? posted at Smoky Mountain Family Historian. Lori's grandfather's sister is surrounded by friends in a photo. Who are they? Lori, I think this one requires a dowsing rod.

— ¤ —

Stephen J. Danko wants to know Are You My Mother? posted at Steve's Genealogy Blog. So much information, so little help. A name, a name, couldn't they just have added a name? I think the girl does look like your Mother, Steve.

— ¤ —

Lisa says "I wish I’d been invited to this wedding… at 100 Years in America and gives us a bonus, The Cowhey clan circa 1940s: Who’s who? at Small-leaved Shamrock. Leave it to Lisa to invite us to a wedding celebration where everyone looks like they're having a great time, except the bride. And the Cowhey's knew how to gather for a photograph, but who are they. If you have a connection or recognize anyone please contact Lisa. A connection, wouldn't it be wonderful.

— ¤ —

Thomas MacEntee presents Who Are You? I Thought I Knew . . . posted at Destination: Austin Family. Thomas uses a logical progression to try to ascertain the relationship among three photographs and the Unknown Boys.

— ¤ —

And closing the cover on this Smile Album is unknown treasure Found Behind The Freezer posted at footnoteMaven. As always, even Mr. Maven's relatives are here to Smile For The Camera!

— ¤ —



Thank You All!

Thank you to everyone who participated in this fantastic 9th Edition of Smile For The Camera and welcome to all the first-time contributors. It is evident from each and every article that a great deal of time, effort, love, research and logical thinking went into each photographic contribution. As Randy would say, please take a moment to stop and comment and show your appreciation!

— ¤ — ¤ —

Now The Call For Submissions!

10th EDITION

Smile For The Camera
10 February 2009


The word prompt for the 10th Edition of Smile For The Camera is Costume? No, not as in Halloween. Costume as in dress in general; especially the distinctive style of dress of a people, class, or period. Show us that picture that you found with your family collection or purchased that shows the costumes of the rich to the not so rich, from the civil war to the psychedelic sixties. I know you have them, so share. Admission is free with every photograph!

Your submission may include as many or as few words as you feel are necessary to describe your treasured photograph. Those words may be in the form of an expressive comment, a quote, a journal entry, a poem (your own or a favorite), a scrapbook page, or a heartfelt article. The choice is yours!

Deadline for submission is midnight (PT)
10 February 2009

Posted - 15 February 2009

H
OW TO SUBMIT:

There are two options:

1. Send an email to the host, footnoteMaven. Include the title and permalink URL of the post you are submitting, your name, and the name of your blog. Put 'Smile For The Camera' clearly in the title of your email!

2. Use the handy submission form provided by Blog Carnival, or select the Bumper Sticker in the upper right hand corner.

See you at the Carnival!


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